Erasmus Hobart and the Golden Arrow

How true are legends? We’ll never know. To know the truth behind legends, we’d need to travel back in time. Which is just what Erasmus Hobart, a school teacher (History and Physics) is able to do. He’s developed a time machine and decides to find out the truth behind the legend of Robin Hood ahead of the school play.

The opening chapter reads like the opening to a James Bond film as we’re introduced to Hobart and his time travelling machine. He’s travelled back to when Lady Godiva took to the streets and is lucky to escape. His journey back to Robin Hood’s time is trickier when he makes an enemy of Guy Gisborne and gets separated from the machine. He soon discovers what Robin Hood was like and has to ensure that he doesn’t ruin history. What was Robin Hood like? Well, that would spoil the book!

An easy to read and enjoyable book. Hobart’s adventure is a great one to follow and I thoroughly enjoyed the book. Give it a go and I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

Rating (out of 5): *****


Very British Problems Volume 3: Still Awkward, Still Raining

There seem to be so many unwritten rules in Britain and Very British Problems highlights them. The problems are separated into different areas and it’s amazing how many you have encountered or, even better, do yourself. I would have to agree that it’s close to impossible to watch cricket without miming a forward defensive shot. The ones I recognise myself doing were the ones I found funniest.

As well as being an enjoyable read (although being British, I should probably say it’s, ‘alright’) it got me thinking about other things that may be termed British problems. I wonder if I’m the only one who will cross the road at traffic lights checking that the light has turned red; it’s for two reasons: I want to make sure that the green man actually means I can cross and also to let the drivers waiting that I can see it’s red so I know I should be crossing.

It’s a short book and quickly read, but every page is excellent.

Rating (out of 5): *****

Memoirs of a bar steward

Jacob Cox is named as the landlord for the pub his family have bought on the coast. He has the vision to make the pub one of the most successful in the country, nevermind the town. His family just can’t see his plans and how they will lead to success. Of course, it might just be because the ideas aren’t actually that great…

A short book that’s easy to pick up and get in to. It is humorous throughout and ends on a cliffhanger after Jacob’s visit to a rival pub. Well worth a read.

Rating (out of 5): ****

Foggy’s Blog

Morton Astley Fogarty (Foggy) is blogging about his life. He lives at home, works in an insurance call centre and is involved in an amateur dramatic production of Grease. However, in all aspects, he’s out of his depth. Despite being out of his depth, he’s blissfully unaware and looks for the best in everyone and everything. This results in plenty of mis-understandings, the highlight being when Foggy is called in for a disciplinary meeting at work. Foggy is a lovable character and it’s a short, amusing book.

Rating (out of 5): *****

The Pirates! In an adventure with Moby Dick

The Pirate Captain decides that their ship has seen better days (with the mast constantly collapsing, he’s probably right). The Pirates buy a new ship from Cutlass Liz. She’s famed for dealing with non-payers brutally. Which could be a major problem as the Pirates don’t have the 6000 doubloons the new ship costs. The Pirate Captain has a number of ideas to raise the necessary money, but they don’t work out and keep on bumping into a character called Ahab, who lost his leg to a whale and wants revenge. The reward to anyone who catches the whale? 6000 doubloons. The Pirates look to find the whale, claim the reward and pay for their ship.

An easy read and fun story. The pirates are named according to distinguishing features that they possess and the Pirate Captain is a lovable character, but often seems out of his depth. I recommend this to everyone.

Rating (out of 5): *****

Book review – Utter Folly

Olly invites his friend James to his house in the country. But then Olly gets arrested and can’t make the weekend, although he does ask James to pick up a package for him. James could never have been prepared for what he encounters, with Olly’s family best described as being eccentric. James could also not have been prepared for the situations he finds himself in and is also unaware of what’s in the package he’s asked to collect.

Utter Folly is a comedy set in the English countryside. James is pretty hapless, but a lovable character who is well out of his comfort zone and little match for the formidable characters he encounters. An easy read and funny throughout.

Rating (out of 5): *****

Book review: Second Chance

Second Chance follows Biffo Brimstone, who quits his high-paid job at a television company in protest at having to work on quiz shows. He breaks the news to his materialistic wife and children and ends up leaving the house. He travels and ends up in Fondling-Under-Water, a village in the countryside.

Fondling-Under-Water is populated by eccentric and lovable characters. The pub is a danger to all newcomers, but is the focal point for the village. Along with the cricket team. It’s not long before Biffo gets called up. But it’s just not cricket…

The characters are all developed and the villagers take to Biffo, making him one of their own. There are only a couple of cricket matches in the book. There are believable aspects to the game and also some that are less likely to occur. You would not have to be a cricket lover to enjoy the book and it reads like Wodehouse at times. An excellent book.

Rating (out of 5): *****