The Liquidator

British Special Security are tired of embarrassing situations; it inevitably leads to embarrassing questions. It’s decided that action is needed to avoid situations in the future. Mostyn, the second-in-command is entrusted with ensuring that problems are removed before they become a problem and he believes he knows just the man – Boysie Oakes. When Oakes heads off for a weekend away with Mostyn’s secretary, he soon finds himself embroiled in a plot that would result in a situation beyond embarrassing. Can Oakes save the day?

The Liquidator is the first in the Boysie Oakes series and gives the back story as to how Oakes became a secret agent. It also shows what type of character Oakes is and he’s not the standard secret agent/assassin material.

A gentle comedy combined with a thriller, it’s different to what I’ve read before and was an enjoyable read.

Rating (out of 5): ****

Advertisements

D-Boys

An American system has been hacked into and Mike Brown, a computer expert, joins a SWAT team on a regulation mission to apprehend the culprits. Moments later, he’s the only man left standing. They’ve stumbled upon something bigger and Brown is soon assigned to the D-Boys, an elite unit that is unknown outside of those who need to know. Brown joins them on missions around the world, but it seems as though an online game is the key. Terrorists are able to communicate in secret and practice against targets. Power cuts in America are followed by chemical attacks. When it appears as though things can’t get any worse, it is discovered that in the game missions have been undertaken against a nuclear weapon storage facility. This was only a rehearsal and in real life, the facility is stormed and there’s a nuclear weapon on the loose with the West Coast of America the target…

D-Boys is an excellent thriller that moves along at a fast pace throughout. With the online game as well, it can almost be described as a thriller within a thriller. The action is frequent throughout and takes place at a frenetic pace. It’s well worth a read.

Rating (out of 5): *****

Fallout

Nick Sullivan sees his best friend murdered by three men at sea and manages to escape. He reports the murder, but becomes the only suspect. Which isn’t surprising considering no-one else has seen the three men and Nick’s wife was having an affair with his best friend. Sullivan decides to find the three men and prove his innocence

Whilst it’s not surprising that the police don’t believe him, it’s a shame because the three men have access to plutonium. Approximately five pounds. And they’re blackmailing the British government – £60m in diamonds or the plutonium will be released. There’s only 48 hours for the government. It become a race against time for the authorities. The soon discover that Sullivan is tracking the three men. Find Sullivan and they find the blackmailers. But how do you find men who don’t want to be found?

Fallout is a good thriller and the plot soon becomes apparent. However, how the plutonium will be released is not revealed until late in the day. As the time starts to run out, the pace and tension increase accordingly. A very good thriller and the first book in the Nick Sullivan series.

Rating (out of 5): ****

Fatherland

It’s April 1964, Hitler is still in power and Germany rules Europe. A body is pulled from a lake and Xavier March is the detective assigned to the case. It turns out to be a Nazi official. As March investigates, he discovers more about the past of the man and his involvement in Nazi policy. This results in him making powerful enemies within the Gestapo and put a meeting between Germany and America in jeopardy.

Fatherland is a thriller that increases in tension as it progresses. Each discovery March makes leads to more questions and puts him in more danger. As the tension increases, so does the pace of the novel. It took me some time to get into it, but it’s a good book.

Rating (out of 5): ****

Erasmus Hobart and the Golden Arrow

How true are legends? We’ll never know. To know the truth behind legends, we’d need to travel back in time. Which is just what Erasmus Hobart, a school teacher (History and Physics) is able to do. He’s developed a time machine and decides to find out the truth behind the legend of Robin Hood ahead of the school play.

The opening chapter reads like the opening to a James Bond film as we’re introduced to Hobart and his time travelling machine. He’s travelled back to when Lady Godiva took to the streets and is lucky to escape. His journey back to Robin Hood’s time is trickier when he makes an enemy of Guy Gisborne and gets separated from the machine. He soon discovers what Robin Hood was like and has to ensure that he doesn’t ruin history. What was Robin Hood like? Well, that would spoil the book!

An easy to read and enjoyable book. Hobart’s adventure is a great one to follow and I thoroughly enjoyed the book. Give it a go and I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.

Rating (out of 5): *****

Memoirs of a bar steward

Jacob Cox is named as the landlord for the pub his family have bought on the coast. He has the vision to make the pub one of the most successful in the country, nevermind the town. His family just can’t see his plans and how they will lead to success. Of course, it might just be because the ideas aren’t actually that great…

A short book that’s easy to pick up and get in to. It is humorous throughout and ends on a cliffhanger after Jacob’s visit to a rival pub. Well worth a read.

Rating (out of 5): ****

Playing Truant

Playing Truant has five members of a mortgage foreclosure team attending a conference when one of them decides he doesn’t want to go into the meeting. It’s his hometown and three other members of the team join him in visiting some old haunts, whilst the team leader remains. The team finally return and the reaction is not what they expected.

The book takes place over a short period of time. It aims to focus on a real life situation and achieves this, not relying on over the top action or exaggerated situations. Whilst a strength of the book, it also leaves you wanting something else to happen.

Rating (out of 5): ***